Agricultural schemes in india, Complete List | UPSC 2023

if you want to know the details of a complete list of the Agricultural schemes in india,You’re in a right article.Read the article thoroughly to understand.

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The Government of India has developed a number of agricultural plans and programmes to help the country’s agriculture industry expand and thrive.

These programmes attempt to offer farmers with financial aid, subsidies, and other types of assistance, as well as to enhance agricultural infrastructure and utilities such as irrigation and water management. These programmes aim to boost crop yields and revenue for farmers while also promoting sustainable and climate-resilient agricultural methods. Some of these programmes are aimed towards specific types of farmers, such as small and marginal farmers, while others are more general. Furthermore, the programmes aim to improve farmers’ livelihoods by providing them with new and creative agricultural practises, as well as increased market access.and better price realization for their produce

Pradhan mantri kisan samman nidhi yojana

The Pradhan Mantri Kisan Samman Nidhi (PM-KISAN) programme is a flagship initiative of the Government of India for providing income support to small and marginal farmers. The initiative was introduced on February 24, 2019 by the Ministry of Agriculture and Farmers’ Welfare and is being implemented by the Ministry of Agriculture and Farmers’ Welfare. The scheme’s major goal is to complement the financial requirements of small and marginal farmers, who frequently lack the resources to invest in their farms, as well as to provide them with financial stability and security.

The initiative provides financial help to small and marginal farmers in the form of a direct cash transfer of INR 6,000 per year, divided into three equal payments of INR 2,000 each. The plan is aimed towards small and marginal farmers, who possess cultivable land of up to 2 hectares. The initiative is administered using Aadhaar-based Direct Benefit Transfer (DBT) technology, and cash transfers are delivered straight to the recipients’ bank accounts.

The scheme is meant to support small and marginal farmers in paying their costs on seeds, fertilisers, and other inputs, and to provide them with financial security. The initiative is projected to assist about 12 lakh small and marginal farmers, and the government has budgeted INR 75,000 crore for it in the 2019-20 Union Budget. The Central Government has introduced the PM-Kisan initiative to help small and marginal farmers, who are the lifeblood of Indian agriculture.

Small and marginal farmers receive 6000 INR per year in three equal instalments under the plan. The initiative is administered using Aadhaar-based Direct Benefit Transfer (DBT) technology, and cash transfers are delivered straight to the recipients’ bank accounts. The initiative is meant to support small and marginal farmers in paying their costs on seeds, fertilisers, and other inputs, and to provide them with financial security.

Pradhan mantri Fasal Bima Yojana

The Pradhan Mantri Fasal Bima Yojana (PMFBY) is an Indian government-funded crop insurance scheme. The scheme’s goal is to offer farmers with insurance coverage and financial assistance in the case of crop loss or damage caused by unanticipated occurrences such as natural disasters, pests, and illnesses. The system is being implemented in collaboration with the government, insurance firms, and farmers, with the government carrying a large share of the premium cost. The plan is essential for farmers who have taken out crop loans from banks and optional for everyone else.

Farmers are expected to pay a tiny portion of the premium cost under PMFBY, while the remainder is funded by the government and insurance firms. The system covers more than 50 crops, including both food and non-food crops. The insurance is offered on an area-yield basis, which means that compensation is computed based on crop area and predicted production.

The programme also contains a weather-based crop insurance component, which covers crop loss caused by unfavourable weather conditions such as drought, excessive rainfall, and hailstorms.

The scheme is carried out through a network of insurance companies chosen through a competitive bidding procedure. Insurance businesses must have a valid licence from the Insurance Regulatory and Development Authority of India (IRDAI) and a net value of at least INR 100 crore. Various government institutions, including the Agriculture Insurance Company of India Limited (AIC), the National Bank for Agriculture and Rural Development (NABARD), and State Level Banks, also assist the initiative (SLBs).

The scheme also incorporates a variety of measures designed to assure openness and accountability, such as crop cutting trials using technology, online premium payment and claim settlement, and a grievance redressal process.

PMFBY is one of the Government of India’s key schemes for ensuring farmer welfare and making farming a profitable vocation.

Pradhan mantri krishi sinchai yojana

The Pradhan Mantri Krishi Sinchai Yojana (PMKSY) is an Indian government initiative that was started in 2015 with the goal of supplying irrigation to agricultural land and increasing the country’s water usage efficiency. The scheme’s major goal is to obtain “more crop per drop” by encouraging precision irrigation and other water-saving technology. It is a synthesis of numerous current schemes and new efforts aiming at offering end-to-end irrigation supply chain solutions. The plan, administered in partnership with state governments by the Ministry of Jal Shakti, aims to put more area under irrigation, boost agricultural production, and encourage water conservation and effective use of water resources. The scheme’s key components are as follows:

  • Accelerated Irrigation Benefit Program (AIBP)
  • Har Khet Ko Pani (Water for Every Farm)
  • More crop per drop
  • Watershed Development
  • On-Farm Water Management (OFWM)
  • Command Area Development (CAD)
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It also contains a component called “Watershed Development,” which tries to increase overall rainfed agriculture production by addressing the entire watershed as a unit and applying different soil and moisture conservation strategies. It also strives to boost water availability through rainwater gathering, groundwater recharging, and efficient surface water usage.

The PMKSY is being implemented in a mission mode, with the scheme’s success being tracked on a regular basis at the national, state, and district levels using a web-based monitoring system. The system is being implemented in all of India’s states and union territories.

The PMKSY also contains a “Integrated Watershed Management Program (IWMP)” component, which attempts to protect and manage water resources by building check dams, percolation tanks, and other water collecting facilities. It also involves the establishment of a National Water Management Plan to guarantee the best use of water resources and the implementation of an online Water Management Information System (WMIS) to track the scheme’s progress.

Another important component of PMKSY is “Minor Irrigation,” which intends to offer irrigation facilities to small and marginal farmers by building small irrigation projects like as dug wells, bore wells, and lift irrigation schemes. This component also comprises renovating and modernising existing small irrigation schemes in order to increase their efficiency and efficacy.

The PMKSY also includes a “Micro Irrigation Fund” component, which intends to give farmers with financial help for the construction of micro-irrigation systems such as drip irrigation and spray irrigation. The fund also intends to give farmers with subsidies for the purchase of micro-irrigation equipment as well as training in the usage of these systems.

In addition to these components, PMKSY has a component called “Farm Pond” that intends to give irrigation services to farmers by building farm ponds that may be utilised for irrigation, fishery, and livestock purposes.

Overall, the PMKSY is a comprehensive plan aimed at addressing different irrigation and water management challenges in the agriculture sector, with the ultimate goal of enhancing agricultural production and improving farmers’ livelihoods across the country.

e-NAM Scheme (Electronic national agriculture market)

The e-NAM (National Agricultural Market) project is a government of India effort started in 14th April 2016 to build a unified national online market for agricultural commodities. The plan intends to give farmers with better pricing for their goods by linking them directly to customers around the country, as well as to provide a smooth and transparent trading platform for farmers and buyers.

The e-NAM platform is a web-based trading network that connects APMCs (Agricultural Produce Market Committees) and other marketplaces around the country. It enables farmers to sell their goods online to customers from all over the country, removing the need for them to travel to physical markets and, as a result, lowering transaction costs and increasing income.

The platform supports the trading process with capabilities such as real-time price discovery, quality verification and grading, digital payment, and dispute resolution. Farmers may also get weather, agricultural diseases and pests, and market pricing via the website.

The plan is being phased in, and more than 585 regulated marketplaces from 17 states and two union territories are already connected with the e-NAM platform. By 2022, the programme hopes to connect over 5,000 markets across the country and establish a unified national market for agricultural commodities.

The e-NAM system is viewed as a game changer in the Indian agriculture sector since it provides farmers with a larger market to sell their goods and buyers with a greater selection of products at affordable costs. It is also projected to increase agricultural market efficiency by decreasing middlemen and transaction costs, as well as fostering transparency and fair trading practises.

Several more initiatives to assist farmers and traders are included in the e-NAM system. The “e-NAM Suvidha Provider” programme, for example, intends to give technical and operational assistance to the e-NAM platform. This includes providing help for the registration and integration of new markets, training for farmers, merchants and authorities, and providing technical support for the proper running of the platform.

Another project under the e-NAM plan is the “Price Deficiency Payment (PDP),” which attempts to offer farmers with a financial safety net if prices fall below the minimum support price (MSP). This is accomplished by transferring the difference between the market price and the MSP to the farmers’ bank accounts via direct benefit transfer (DBT). This reduces the danger of farmers receiving poor prices for their goods while also ensuring that they get a minimum support price.

The e-NAM system also includes a “Agriculture Market Infrastructure Fund (AMIF),” which intends to offer states with financial help for the development of market infrastructure, such as market yards, godowns, and other facilities. The goal is to improve the entire infrastructure of the markets and make them more appealing to farmers and dealers.

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The national e-NAM programme is continuously monitored, and regular assessments are conducted to assess its efficacy and identify areas for improvement. Farmers and merchants have praised the initiative, which has been credited with improving farmer prices and enhancing agricultural market efficiency.

Overall, the e-NAM programme is a significant step toward establishing a unified national market for agricultural goods in India, which will help farmers and merchants by offering a larger market and higher prices for their produce. It will also contribute to increased agricultural market efficiency and encourage transparency and fair trading practises.

Pradhan mantri kisan mandhan yojana

The Pradhan Mantri Kisan Mandhan Yojana (PM-KMY) is an Indian pension system created by the government in 31st May 2019. The plan intends to offer a monthly pension to small and marginal farmers (those with less than 2 hectares of land) aged 18 to 40.

Farmers can join the programme by making minor contributions during their working years and earn a set income when they reach the age of 60. In addition, the government contributes to the farmer’s account. The scheme’s goal is to give farmers with financial stability in their old age and to ensure that they have a steady source of income once they retire from farming.

All small and marginal farmers in the country, regardless of caste, religion, or gender, are eligible for the initiative. Tenant farmers, oral lessees, and sharecroppers who cultivate land on a regular basis are also eligible for the plan.

Farmers may join the scheme by going to their local Common Service Center and entering their Aadhaar number and bank account information. Farmers can contribute to the plan after enrolling by using their bank account or by visiting the CSC.

The government intends to cover around 5 crore farmers in the first phase of the initiative and 10 crore farmers in the second phase. The initiative is being conducted in partnership with state governments by the Ministry of Agriculture and Farmers Welfare.

The PM-KMY is anticipated to give financial stability to small and marginal farmers in their old age, as well as a consistent source of income when they retire from farming. The initiative is also projected to raise farmers’ income and livelihood security, as well as their general level of living.

Soil health card scheme

The Soil Health Card (SHC) project is an Indian government effort established in 19th February 2015 to offer farmers with a “Soil Health Card” including information on their soil’s nutrient status. The initiative intends to assist farmers in improving the productivity and fertility of their land by informing them about nutrient shortages in their soil and proposing the proper fertilisers and other inputs to remedy such deficiencies.

Soil samples are collected from farmers’ farms and tested in a soil testing lab under the system. The data are then used to create a Soil Health Card for each farmer, which provides information about their soil’s nutritional condition, such as pH levels, organic carbon levels, and the levels of different macro- and micronutrients. The card also gives suggestions for fertilisers and other inputs to solve any inadequacies.

The plan is being phased in and is being administered by the Ministry of Agriculture and Farmers’ Welfare in partnership with state governments. By 2020, the government intends to cover all 14 crore farmers in the country.

The Soil Health Card system is seen as an important step in improving the productivity and fertility of the country’s agricultural land, as well as assisting farmers in achieving higher yields and incomes. The initiative is meant to assist farmers in reducing their reliance on chemical fertilisers and adopting more sustainable and environmentally friendly farming techniques.

The Soil Health Card, in addition to providing information about the soil’s nutrient status, also includes information on the levels of micronutrients and secondary nutrients such as zinc, boron, and sulphur, and advises farmers on the appropriate fertiliser dosages to use to correct any deficiencies. It also suggests agricultural patterns and nutrient management strategies that are suited for their soil type.

The system also contains a component of soil health management, which aims to raise farmer knowledge of the importance of soil health and the requirement for fertiliser balance. The system also involves farmer and extension worker training and extension operations to educate them on fertiliser use, nutrient management, and soil health management methods.

The system also contains a component of soil health management, which aims to raise farmer knowledge of the importance of soil health and the requirement for fertiliser balance. The system also involves farmer and extension worker training and extension operations to educate them on fertiliser use, nutrient management, and soil health management methods.

Pradhan mantri annadata aay sanrakshan abhiyan

The Pradhan Mantri Annadata Aay Sanrakshan Abhiyan (PM-AASHA) is an Indian government initiative introduced in 2018 with the goal of guaranteeing remunerative pricing for farmers’ output and providing a mechanism for price support to farmers if prices fall below the Minimum Support Price (MSP).

The scheme consists of three major components:

1)Price Support Scheme (PSS): The government purchases crops from farmers at the MSP if market prices fall below the MSP. The farmers will be paid straight into their bank accounts by the government.

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2)Price Deficiency Payment (PDP) scheme: Farmers will get a direct benefit transfer (DBT) for the shortfall between the market price and the MSP under this component. This will assist farmers in reducing the danger of receiving poor prices for their goods.

3)Private Procurement & Stockist Scheme (PPSS): The government permits private merchants and companies to acquire crops from farmers at the MSP under this component. The government would pay the companies for the difference between the MSP and the market price.

The scheme is conducted in partnership with state governments by the Department of Agriculture, Cooperation, and Farmers Welfare. The scheme’s goal is to guarantee that farmers obtain remunerative prices for their produce, to offer a mechanism for price assistance to farmers in the event that prices fall below the MSP, and to ensure that farmers receive a fair price for their produce. The plan applies to all crops for which the Government of India has approved MSP.

National food security mission

The National Food Security Mission (NFSM) is an Indian government project aimed at increasing food grain output and productivity, notably rice, wheat, and pulses. The Ministry of Agriculture and Farmers Welfare is in charge of carrying out the mission, which was initiated in 2007.

The NFSM’s primary goals are as follows:

  • Increase food grain production by 10 million tonnes
  • Increase productivity of rice, wheat, and pulses by 10-20%
  • Increase the area under cultivation of pulses and oilseeds by 2 million hectares
  • Provide sustainable livelihoods to farmers

The NFSM focuses on the following areas to attain these goals:

1)Crop production: The mission gives farmers with financial support to purchase seed, fertiliser, and other inputs. It also encourages the employment of innovative technology to boost food yields, such as precision farming and conservation agriculture.

2)Post-harvest management: The mission encourages the building of storage facilities such as godowns and silos to assist farmers in storing their food and reducing post-harvest losses. It also teaches farmers how to properly manage and preserve their harvest.

3)Extension services: Through extension services, such as training and demonstrations on the most recent farming methods, the mission provides technical help to farmers.

4)Research and Development: The mission funds research and development initiatives to boost agricultural genetic potential and produce new crop varieties that are pest and disease resistant.

The NFSM is carried out through a network of state governments, agricultural universities, and research institutions. The mission has been effective in raising food grain output and productivity, as well as helping farmers better their incomes.

However, it has encountered several difficulties, such as a lack of appropriate execution, insufficient finance, and insufficient infrastructure. Despite these difficulties, the National Food Security Mission continues to play a vital role in guaranteeing India’s food security.

The National Food Security Mission is a government initiative that aims to increase the production and productivity of food grains, particularly rice, wheat, and pulses in India. The mission is implemented through a network of state governments, agricultural universities, and research institutes, and has been successful in increasing food grain production and productivity and improving the livelihoods of farmers. However, it also has faced some challenges such as lack of proper implementation, inadequate funding, and inadequate infrastructure.

Paramparagat krishi vikas yojana

The Government of India launched the Paramparagat Krishi Vikas Yojana (PKVY) in 2015 to promote organic farming in the country. The program’s goal is to encourage farmers to use organic farming practises and to improve their livelihoods by producing high-quality organic products.

Farmers are given financial assistance under the PKVY to convert their traditional farming practises to organic farming methods. Farmers can also benefit from training and capacity building to improve their knowledge and skills in organic farming techniques.

Farmers must be registered with the Department of Agriculture and have a minimum of one hectare of land under cultivation to be eligible for the PKVY. Individual farmers as well as farmer groups are eligible for the scheme.

The financial assistance provided under the PKVY includes:

  • A one-time grant of Rs. 20,000 per hectare for the preparation of organic farming land
  • A recurring grant of Rs. 5,000 per hectare per year for three years for the maintenance and management of organic farming
  • A subsidy of 50% on the cost of organic inputs such as seeds, bio-fertilizers, and bio-pesticides

The PKVY also includes an organic product certification process. Farmers who complete the certification process successfully are eligible for a premium price for their products.

In addition to financial assistance and training, the PKVY scheme includes a marketing component to assist farmers in connecting with potential buyers and selling their organic products.

Overall, the PKVY is a comprehensive scheme with the goal of promoting organic farming in India and improving farmers’ livelihoods through the production of high-quality organic products.

It is worth noting that this scheme is launched and implemented by the Ministry of Agriculture and Farmers Welfare, Government of India, and is carried out by state and union territory governments.

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